Being a Coach

Coaches with Special Olympics New York take part in one of the most rewarding experiences of their lives. Are you ready to build friendships and make a real impact on the lives of aspiring athletes? Submit the form below to learn more about coaching with us.

Coaches with Special Olympics New York take part in one of the most rewarding experiences of their lives. Are you ready to build friendships and make a real impact on the lives of aspiring athletes? Submit the form below to learn more about coaching with us.

EligibilityEligibility

Coaches come from all walks of life. Some have coaching experience, but many do not. However, they all have one thing in common. They’re committed to Special Olympics New York and the athletes they coach. All coaches must:

  • Be 16 years old for certification (and 18 to travel to competitions with athletes)
  • Have government-issued identification (driver’s license, military ID or passport)
  • Have knowledge and/or experience in the sport being coached
  • Commit two to three hours for practice on one day of each week during an eight- to 12-week season
  • Spend an additional one to two hours per week on planning during the season
  • Commit two to three weekends to competition during the seasons, plus regional or super-regional, national and world games, as needed
  • Complete a full application, background check and multiple online and in-person training courses
  • Complete coaching recertification every three years
ExpectationsExpectations

Special Olympics New York is committed to the highest ideals of sport. We expect all coaches to hold the same values. That means:

  • Demonstrating respect for others
  • Ensure a positive experience for each athlete
  • Acting professionally and taking responsibility for actions
  • Providing quality service to the athletes
  • Creating a safe physical environment
  • Teaching your sport’s fundamental skills and rules in a positive way
  • Effectively planning for all aspects of your sport’s season
  • Directing athletes in competition and encouraging overall health and fitness
  • Helping athletes develop their character and manage their relationships
I saw one of my teenage athletes chest-bump his dad at the end of a race. Afterward, the dad said that he had never had that type of interaction with his son. The moment solidified why I love being part of Special Olympics New York.
Brian Tenety